Book Review Cooking in Other Women’s Kitchen: Domestic Workers in the South 1860-1960

Book Review Cooking in Other Women’s Kitchen: Domestic Workers in the South 1860-1960. The book review needs to do the following Tell what the book is about.

Book Review Cooking in Other Women’s Kitchen: Domestic Workers in the South 1860-1960

Firstly, the book review needs to do the following Tell what the book is about.

Secondly, do not simply summarize the story, but give the topic, geographic area, and time span that the book covers. This should take only one mid-length paragraph.

Thirdly, give the book’s key argument/point.

Further, discuss the book’s sources and methodology: what kind of evidence and methods the author uses to make his/her point.

Additionally, analyze if the argument hold water.

Moreover, is the point well-made and supported with solid evidence and reasoning?

Finally, If you were a juror, would you buy the author’s argument/point or not?  Why or why not. Your take. What did you think about the book?  Did it interest or entertain you?  Was it well written and clearly organized?  This is the only openly subjective part of your review

More details:

Hendley on Sharpless, ‘Cooking in Other Women’s Kitchens: Domestic Workers in the South, 1860-1960’

Research on female domestic workers, past and present, is an important and growing field of scholarship. The stories of these workers, many of whom are women of color and/or immigrants, have been documented by historians, sociologists, and feminist or ethnic studies scholars alike.[1] Rebecca Sharpless’s book, Cooking in Other Women’s Kitchens: Domestic Workers in the South, 1865-1960, contributes to this body of research by providing an engaging glimpse into the work and family lives of African American female cooks in the post-Emancipation South.

As enumerated by Sharpless, the book has three main purposes: 1) to investigate how African American women transitioned from slavery to employment through domestic work; 2) to examine how these cooks managed to survive despite discrimination and difficult working conditions; and 3) to counter popular stereotypical images of African American cooks. Using sources including letters to New Deal agencies, interviews from the Federal Writers’ Project and the “Living Atlanta” oral history project, autobiographies, and cookbooks, Sharpless follows through on her goals.

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